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Charleville Tourism & Travel



Charleville Australia
Charleville QLD
Charleville Outback Queensland
Charleville
Charleville

Charleville Australia


Located on the Warrego River, some 760 km west of Brisbane, Charleville is one of Queensland's largest country towns.

Charleville - History


In 1868 the outback was explored and gazetted by Irish pioneer, W.A. Tully. Mr Tully named Charleville for his hometown Charleville in Ireland. The railways reached Charleville in March 1888, providing a direct link between Charleville and the state capital, Brisbane. The artisans who built the famous Cobb and Co stagecoaches were brought to Charleville in 1890 because trees endemic to the area proved stronger and more resilient to the needs of the harsh conditions th coaches faced on long journeys into the outback. In 1922, the first fare paying passenger service scheduled by Qantas was from Charleville to Cloncurry, via Longreach and Winton.


Charleville - Today


Situated in the heart of mulga country on the banks of the Warrego River, today Charleville is the centre of a rich sheep and cattle district.

Charleville - Attractions


The Cosmos Centre is an experience that explores the Australian night sky and its significance to Aboriginal culture. The Royal Flying Doctor Service visitor Centre: has exhibits displaying memorabilia from the past and present and ' A Day in the Life of the Flying Doctor'. The Charleville National Parks and Wildlife Centre has a captive breeding programme for endangered yellow-footed rock wallabies and bilbies and the Charleville Historic House Museum has machinery displays including steam engine and a rail ambulance. The CDEP Workshop displays and sales of Aboriginal art. The Vortex Gun is a 5 mtr long gun that was used in 1902 in an unsuccessful rainmaking experiment and the Heritage Trail is a self-guide walk past heritage buildings of Charleville.

Charleville - Nearby Attractions


A monument marks the area close to Charleville where the Australian aviation pioneering brothers Keith and Ross Smith later Sir Keith and Sir Ross Macpherson Smith were forced to land with engine trouble in 1919. The brothers continued their flight and won the Commonwealth Government's 10 000 prize for being the first Australian pilots to fly from England to Australia within 30 consecutive days. The Smith brothers were accompanied by mechanics J.M. Bennett and W.H. Shiers. Also nearby Charleville is the Tregole National Park; a semi-arid National Park with a vulnerable, fragile ecosystem.