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South Alligator Travel & Tourism
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Package Holidays in Northern Territory



South Alligator Kakadu Australia
Kakadu NT
Kakadu Top End Northern Territory
South Alligator Kakadu Northern Territory
South Alligator Kakadu Northern Territory

South Alligator Kakadu Northern Territory Australia


Located some 147 km southeast of Darwin along the Stuart - Arnhem Highways and 149km northeast of Katherine, Kakadu National Park is accessible by conventional vehicles for the majority of its vast area with a sealed highway. Covering 20,000 square km of the Alligator River Region of the Northern Territory, Kakadu National Park is Australia's largest National Park, and in 1992 the Kakadu was awarded World Heritage status as 'an example of superlative natural phenomena and being directly associated with living traditions of outstanding universal significance' Kakadu uniquely encompasses almost the entire drainage basin of the South Alligator River and within this wilderness is found most of the major wildlife habitat typical in the Top End. The crocodile infested South Alligator Riiver drains into van Diemen Gulf and is tidal in 9 its lower reaches. The headwaters of the South Alligator River and its major tributaries rise in the sandstone plateau region to south, flowing through the shallow valleys of the lowlands to discharge through massive flood plains.

Kakadu - South Alligator -Aboriginal Ownership


The Aboriginal people of the regions and National Parks jointly manage Kakadu National Park and a visit to Kakadu is best started at the Bowali Cultural Centre near Jabiru or the Warradjan Aboriginal Cultural Centre near Cooinda Kakadu is home to one of the highest concentrated areas of ancient aboriginal Rock Art sites in the world; the most famous examples are at Nourlangie Rock and Ubirr and date back tens of thousands of years.Covering almost 20, 000 square km of the Alligator River Region of the Northern Territory, making it Australia's largest National Park, Kakadu National Park is the king of Australia's National Parks; and in 1992, the Kakadu was awarded World Heritage status. Kakadu uniquely encompasses almost the entire drainage basin of the South Alligator River and within this wilderness is found most of the major wildlife habitat typical in the Top End.


Kakadu - South Alligator - Places of Interest


Access should be checked and the 4WD driver should visit Jim Jim to the east of the South Alligator Valley and Twin Falls, Falls, Plunge Pool, Barramundi Gorge to discover waterfalls, monsoon forests and plunge pools. Ranger Uranium Mine, covering an area of approximately five square km lies, rather contentiously, in the Alligator Rivers region within the boundaries of Kakadu National Park.

Kakadu - South Alligator - Wildlife


In the Northern Territory, Red Kangaroos run in mobs of around ten animals, with one dominant male mating with the females. Dingos are lean and taut, medium sized dogs. Apart from family packs of parents and offspring, dingos live and hunt alone. The Territory region of outback Australia has a population of wild cattle and camels, remnants of the days when they were either the beasts of burden that helped to settle the outback, or were the reason for settlement. The birdlife of Kakadu National Park is prolific, with 275 known species.

Kakadu - South Alligator - Crocodiles


Crocodiles are part of the landscape of Kakadu National Park; especially so at Yellow Waters, a tributary of South Alligator River. All Crocodiles should be regarded as dangerous should never be approached; local advise must be sought regarding swimming. Freshwater crocodiles have longer, smoother and more slender snouts than their more dangerous cousin, the saltwater crocodile. Freshies grow up to three metres long and are not easily distinguishable from the dangerous saltie; Freshies, live in freshwater rivers, gorges and billabongs where they hunt for fish, frogs and other small animals. All Crocodiles should be regarded as dangerous should never be approached; local advise must be sought regarding swimming. Estuarine or Saltwater Crocodiles salties live in the brackish waters of the coastlines but are just as happy in freshwater rivers, swamps and billabongs swimming many hundred kilometres inland. Salties are now found all across the north of Australia again after being seriously depleted by extensive hunting from the 1940s the time that Darwin was bombed until the 1970's when they were made a protected species; they are the largest reptile in the world in terms of mass and the largest crocodile with a confirmed measurement. Males can grow up to 6 or 7 metres long and 1000kg; eating mainly small reptiles, fish, turtles, wading birds but also killing and eating larger prey; they are known to take humans, wild pigs, buffaloes, and also livestock such as cattle and horses. All Crocodiles should be regarded as dangerous should never be approached; local advise must be sought regarding swimming.